TNT-Audio Readers' Corner
Monthly section devoted to your letters, positive and negative feedback about everything related to Audio and HiFi.

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Your messages to our staff

Re: TNT AirCoil signal cables
Dear Roger,
I finally found and bought all the necessary materials for build my own TNT AirCoil cables. Just a couple of questions more before starting to work on them.
I well know that you made for you cables with 4 wires and now you suggest to make them with just 2 wires, but, sincerely, what is the difference between cables made with 4 wires and cables made with 2 wires? I have enough wire to make cables with 4 wires but I'm wondering, does it worth the effort? I mean, is it something audible/appreciable? Have you ever compared the two kinds of cables?
Regarding the wire in the tube that acts as a ground drain, where should I connect the part of the cable where the internal wire is soldered, to the source or to the other side?
Practically, if we are talking about a CD player and a preamplifier, should I connect the soldered side to the CD player output or to the preamplifier input?
Many thanks,
Paolo - E-mail: paoloxp79 (at) gmail.com

RMC
Hi Paolo,
Good to hear that you are going ahead with your project. I have compared the 2 vs. 4 wire cables and I really don't find any difference in the performance. The 2 wire version is easier to make so I would recommend that you go ahead with that option. Regarding ground/drain/sheild conductor connection for interconnect cables; my preference is to connect all of them all at the preamp so there is a common point. Some people suggest that the ground end of an interconnect should be connected at the source of the signal. I can't see anything wrong with that idea however I plan to stick with my present method.
I should add that I have never been able to detect any difference based on the direction of connection. I would not however claim that there isn't one, just that I haven't experienced it personally in my system.
Enjoy your project.
Roger McCuaig

MHDT Lab Pagoda review
Hi Nick,
I recently purchased the Pagoda due in part to your review. MHDT Lab has been on my radar for quite some time but I never took a chance on their DACs until the Pagoda. I'm glad I did .. I love this DAC. Thank you!
Best Regards,
Melvin - E-mail: melvinjames (at) icloud.com

NW
Hi Melvin,
Thanks for the feedback. I think that all we reviewers are happy to hear from somebody else that we have got things right in a review. I also still use the Pagoda, and obviously love the sound.
Regards,
Nick Whetstone

78 RPM Turntable
Hello David,
I am an Italian TNT-AUDIO reader, I want to tell you about this turntable for the 78 RPM discs: www.vinylengine.com/library/vestax/bdt-2500.shtml. "...main pitch and fine pitch controls, allow you to set the speed from 16rpm to 98rpm continuously..." !!!
(sorry for my bad english)
Bye
Alberto - E-mail: al.esposito (at) email.it

DRH
Hello, Alberto, and thanks for writing! To be honest, I'd forgotten about Vestax, and I really shouldn't have: a now-departed collector friend used to have one, and I remember how its sleek lines and tinted metal cladding brought me up short the first time I saw it. Alas, Vestax apparently went bankrupt in 2014. Too bad, because the data sheet you linked shows that model, at least, to have enough pitch variability for just about any "78" record, even though apparently it had only 33 and 45 stated speeds.
I vaguely remember my friend's having replaced his not long after he bought it, so there may have been reliability or other issues, but I could be mistaken about that; unfortunately, like Vestax, he is no longer around to ask. If any of our other readers has or has owned one of the Vestax tables, I'd welcome more information.
Meanwhile, again, thanks for taking the time and trouble to write and point it out!
David Hoehl

Russell K Red 50 loudspeakers review
Hello,
I was wondering about the system used to evaluate the Russell K Red 50 speakers?
By the way your writing really transmits how you heard these speakers! Well done!
Regards,
Ihor - E-mail: koolblue2 (at) me.com

LC
Dear Ihor,
thanks for your appreciation of my review of the Russell K Red50 speakers. It is always hard to turn deep listening emotions into words, especially if English isn't your mother tongue. As for the evaluating system I used there's not a precise answer, since I've used many different components, belonging to different price ranges. Solid state and tube amps, different sources etc. For this reason I always consider my reviews to be pretty system-independent :-)
When you use many different components your opinion on the item under review is barely affected by the system used.
Thanks for the feedback, it's highly appreciated!
Lucio Cadeddu

Sennheiser HD650 and HD660S
Hello guys,
I'm an old TNT follower, and in the past I've read with high interest your reviews focused on Senn. HD650 (even higher when I've read about integration with SOLO amplifier). Thank you for your work, first of all.
Recently I'm feeling the need of a headphone-based solution in order to increase my listening sessions' duration (a little bit).I was going to purchase an HD650 but suddenly I heard news about the new HD660S, available at almost the same price (369€). On the data-sheet it seems to be an enhanced version, also more "brilliant" than the 650, thus it would be even better for my taste, in fact I normally like "live" behaviour (I currently own a couple of B&W and i'm collecting money for a future upgrade to Klipsh RF7 :-)).
But... I'm afraid the 660s could have lost the "magic" of the 650 after this upgrade, this is why I'm writing this email, hoping you know also this model and can give me a cle of its behaviour, better if compared with 650's one.
Unfortunately I'm not able to try them with listening session somewhere in my town, thus your help to understand the differencies would help me a lot.
Hope you can help me, thank you in advance for your kind reply.
My best regards,
Luca - E-mail: luca.muro (at) gmail.com

AN
Hi Luca,
you won't like the HD650 if you prefer “brilliant” headphones - my HD650's are great but very dark sounding. But I've not heard the 660S.
Hope this helps,
Andy Norman

Dodocool DA158 Noise-cancelling Bluetooth headphones Nick,
Many thanks for telling me about this offer on Dodocool DA158 Noise-cancelling Bluetooth headphones. I have ordered a set from amazon.co.uk (and used the offer code - which worked) and I am looking forward to receiving them. All the best.
James - E-mail: j.hamilton (at) iol.ie

NW
Thanks for letting us know James. I hope that you like the headphones.
Nick Whetstone

Re: Tekton Enzo XL
Hi Todd,
Thanks for your response. It's funny, I did exactly as you suggested, even going so far as to send your review to Karma, Eric's right hand. And you're right Eric is accessible. I rang him and he called me back the next day. Wouldn't it be cool to be Eric? Reading the many glowing reviews like yours, he's kind of the Jimi Hendrix of speakers. Every reviewer seemed to have to work to find superlatives to describe the listening experience. Like with Jimi.
Thank you again for the response and the review. I feel like I'm a better music listener for having read it.
Joe - E-mail: joe.blackett (at) comcast.net

TB
Hi Joe,
thanks for the feedback!
Todd Bromgard

Active vs passive crossover
Hi Nick,
Thank for taking the time to respond - that's really useful advice... I think you've put my active crossover idea to rest with regards to transmission line speakers anyway.
I would happily choose an open baffle design, but am concerned about boundary interference - my living room is 4x5m and there is no opportunity to have the speakers placed into the room, they need to be situated against the wall. I am assuming that an Open Baffle design would not be good for this? If there are any DIT designs you think suitable, then please do let me know.
In my mind, the existing (full or nearly full range) commercial speakers best suited to my placement and room size would be something like a Wilson Audio Duette, Larsen 8 or Grimm Audio LS1 - I think a physical DIY copy of these is possible and I'm quite comfortable constructing my own amps, but the work that the manufacturers put into the crossovers (particularly on the LS1) is quite epic, so I doubt I could replicate it without existing full plans.
Of course I am impressed by Dutch & Dutch 8c and Kii Three, Beolab 90's - but this approach is beyond DIY.
Thanks once again
Gavin - E-mail: gjhodgson (at) yahoo.co.uk

NW
Hi Gavin,
My listening room is a bit smaller than yours, but I have the speakers about a metre from the wall behind them. I live on my own so this isn't an issue for me. Two bits of technology make getting a speaker sounding 'right' much easier. The Mini DSP stuff enables you to tailor a digital crossover (active) very easily using a computer. And DSP can also be used to correct speakers in the room. I use an old Behringer DEQ2496, and the results are very impressive (when it is set up properly).
Regards,
Nick Whetstone

Tekton Enzo XL
Hi Todd,
Your review of the EnzoXL was fantastic and put the final nail in the coffin holding my doubts about buying Tekton. Thank you very much.
Here's my question: what is the number of the color you selected? I absolutely love it and haven't found it or another I like more than it on the Behr charts. I'm going to order my Pendragons this week and wonder if you'd share the color.
Thanks again for the very informative review.
Regards,
Joe - E-mail: joe.blackett (at) comcast.net

TB
Hi Joe,
Thanks for your email. I love the XLs and continue to use them as my reference speaker. I don't know the number of the sage green color used, I just asked Eric Alexander if he could finish them in "sage green" and he obliged. He is very accessible, if you call or email I'm sure he will consult with you. You might even mention you want the same color as he painted mine. Keep me in the loop and let me know how it goes.
Thanks again for writing.
Todd Bromgard

Yamaha NS-1000 speakers review
Hi Mark,
Loved reading your review of the active crossover and the Yamaha NS-1000 speakers and was wondering what were the replacement of the stock woofers in the picture attached. A sizeable diameter on the voice-coil!!
Steve - E-mail: Steve.Coconis (at) td.com

MW
Hi Steve,
I emailed Gary Hargreaves your question and he replied that the modification was completed years ago for a customer. The bass unit was by a company called Hi-Vi. Gary had to cut 4 ‘flats' onto the cast chassis to drop it into the standard Yamaha rebate. I recall HiVi Research from my days writing at Speaker Builder journal, two fellow writers there were involved with the company. By coincidence, they're partnered with a Toronto based company, Swans, not far from you in Scarborough, ON. HiVi soon garnered a good reputation for solid engineering (including those massive voice coils). They are now manufacturing drivers in Guangdong, China, and sell over 3 million drivers per year and also make Swans complete loudspeaker systems.
There are other manufacturers who make 300mm chassis with clipped corners, but the original driver in the NS100M is worth restoring, if necessary.
I hope this is helpful.
Happy listening,
Mark Wheeler

Euphony Audio Transport
Hi, Nick,
I'm writing to let you know that Euphony has been selling GPL-licensed software (Euphony OS) without following the terms of the GPL license, which requires that Euphony make the source code of any GPL software used in their product available for download. Euphony has been contacted about the matter, and recently claimed they no longer sell any GPL software, even as Euphony OS continues to run on their currently-available server products.
It's possible that you may not care about any of this, but I wanted to let you know in case it does matter to you.
Thanks!
Mr. Gil - E-mail: mrgil23 (at) yahoo.com

NW
Hello Mr Gil,
Thank you for contacting me. However, as TNT-Audio is an independent review site, and not connected in any way with Euphony, I can't see that we can do anything to remedy this situation, if indeed it needs remedying. I suspect that there are proper authorities for dealing with such matters.
Regards,
Nick Whetstone

Gold Note vs AQVox
Hi Mark,
I just found out about your review on the Gold Note PH-10 and something caught my attention (in terms of something missing):
I'm concerned about the RF sensitivity compared to the AQVox (tested also by you), that, in my home, I found it to be one of the most silent pieces of PH stages, however, you had some concerns on heavy-noised environments. I'd like to hear your opinion regarding the PH-10 since I have the opportunity to buy one but I wouldn't want one if it's noisier than the AQVox.
Thanks in advance!!
Kind Regards,
Marcelo - E-mail: marcelo.cinicola (at) gmail.com

MW
Hi Marcelo,
I am very aware of the RF interference problems that many people experience with sensitive phono stages. I once used to get taxi radio breakthrough on a Naim NAC42.5 equipped with K moving coil boards (designed to match the Linn Karma), that had not been affected when fitted with S moving coil input boards (designed for the Linn Asak). The problem was resolved with improved system earthing (grounding) arrangements and a lower impedence mains circuit. Therefore the problem may not be as local as within the phono stage itself. For example, the AQVox 2Ci, reviewed by Werner and me, is a balanced input current amplifier, which addresses the RF problem twice over in that one sentence. Balanced connections, by their very nature, have at least 6dB better RF rejection and a typical local NFB (negative feedback) voltage amplification stage is a good RF detector. The ACQvox is balanced from input to output and the Gold Note is balanced at output only. The Gold Note like most other pieces of domestic audio equipment, is cursed with those dreadful RCA phono connectors, which is the only compromise to domestic audio practice.
My listening room has a dedicated mains electricity supply designed to have low impedance at radio frequencies. Therefore these problems are not revealed in this context. The Gold Note PH10 is a well designed piece of electronic hardware with an aluminium case (eddy currents make great Faraday cages). Therefore one would not anticipate noticeable RF problems. The choice of 'standard' EQ rather than Enhanced EQ (with the Neumann correction) is likely to have better RF rejection (depending where the EQ blocks are in the circuit). If the extra historic EQ curve versatility of the Gold Note PH10 is what you need, I would suggest you try to loan one before you buy it. If not, I would suggest you hang on to the equally splendid AQVox 2Ci and use the money to buy more vinyl LP's.
Happy listening,
Mark Wheeler

Fidelis Audio
Something else you could try for the 78 RPM electronics issue: Fidelis Audio makes a replacement for the unobtanium MN6042 chip (also requires a single resistor replacement – the owner of Fidelis Audio can provide the details) that can give you speed control to the *hundredths* as opposed to the tenths. I was a beta tester for the product, have one in my SP15 and it is fantastic. Paired up with a Sumiko FT-3 arm and a Paradox Pulse-bodied-and-SoundSmith-retipped DL-103r, it's a treat. The MN6042 hip was also used in the Technics SP10 MK2, incidentally, so it can also be used to rejuvenate those tables which may have failing speed controllers.
fidelisanalog.com/product/mn6042/
Derek - E-mail: derek_vanveen (at) hotmail.com

DRH
Hello again, Derek,
That information about the replacement chip is most valuable--good to know a workable replacement is out there. Thank you for writing and telling us about it.
David Hoehl

Tisbury Audio vs Gold Note
Hello Mr. Wheeler.
My name is Clyde. I greatly enjoyed your review of the above piece, although you will have to try to control those puns! Kind of sneak up on you don't they?
My reason for writing is I have been considering the
Gold Note PH10 vs the Ifi I-phono-2. The Tisbury Domino is the least expensive of the bunch, but it seems highly competitive with the Gold Note. I wonder then, if you have heard the Ifi? If so, how would you rank it among the three?
A second point, the Tisbury headphone is interesting, especially if it will run off of the Domino, rather than the pre-amp (Greater clarity And immediacy on my vinyl). Have you any prior word re specs/costs/ time to market?
Greatly appreciate your help, and that really was a well done review!
Clyde - E-mail: clyde.lindsay (at) gmail.com

MW
Hi Clyde,
Thank you for the kind words about my reviews, especially the Tisbury Domino review. I do rely on the good folk of the Plebs' Chorus to try to keep the puns in check.

I am a little puzzled about your question. Both the Gold Note PH10 and the Ifi I-Phono-2 have, as their nearly-unique selling points (NUSP?) a spectacular range of phono equalisation (EQ) curves. Therefore the question between those two would be whether one is more accurate than the other, or one sounds better than the other. In terms of value for money, it depends where you live. Even whiloe the UK is still in the European single market, the standard dollar-for-pound mercantile exchange rate seems to prevail. The Ifi I-Phono-2 is £399 in the UK and $399 in the USA. The Gold Note PH10 is nearly £1000 more.

If you need the range of historic phono EQ, then the Tisbury Domino is irrelevant. I've purposely skipped the headphone question about the Tisbury range because it is important to get your phono pre-amplifier correct before contemplating what comes later.

If you do not need that range of historical LP equalisation curves, the Gold Note PH10 and the Ifi I-phono-2 both have unnecessary features that you will be paying for and that may potentially degrade the signal, however minutely (although I could detect no such degradation, it is theoretically possible). More importantly then becomes the match with your pick-up cartridge. If you have a collection of cartridges, or rare cartridges, the ability to change load and gain easily (preferably by remote control) would be valuable. The Gold Note PH10 can be changed on the fly from the front panel. This allows easy optimisation, although some high end models will allow this from your seat, by remote control.

If you only use one popular cartridge with clear gain and load recommendations, if you own a plinth type turntable (e.g. Linn LP12) there are numerous phono head amplifiers available that fit inside the plinth. Without knowing your turntable and cartridge types, it is difficult to offer ideas with any more clarity.

I hope this is helpful, as far as it goes. Try to get the chance to listen to samples of those you've read reviews about; all reviewers have individual prejudices. I looked up the Ifi and only found one review by a reviewer who has written enough that I'd be able to guess their prejudices and read between the lines. For me, timing and phase performance are very important, as are bandwidth and dynamic range (macro and micro) but other experienced reviewers favour other priorities.
Happy auditioning,
Mark Wheeler

Re: TNT AirCoil signal cables
Dear Roger,
First of all, many thanks for your explanation! You are right, it was difficult to find RCA connectors that fit the Aircom and it's also difficult bend it for connecting the devices but the result is very interesting in trasmitted sound quality.
The Aircom Plus capacity, in fact, is 81 pF/m which is less than the 1nF you stated here. What do you think about the Aircom 50 Ohm impedence? Is it good for audiophiles applications?
See attached more detailed specifications about the Aircom Plus and a picture of my cables mounted on my HiFi system.
I hope to find soon all the necessary components for assemble the AirCoil because I'm curious to compare my cables to yours.
BR,
Paolo - E-mail: paoloxp79 (at) gmail.com

RMC
Dear Paolo,
With respect to the 50 ohm impedence of coax cable, I am certainly not an expert on this topic but I can offer you my understanding of this subject. The characteristic impedence of a coax cable, typically 50 or 75 ohms is a useful value for data communication systems designers. Coax cable was designed for transmission of data in the megahertz frequencies over distances that are much longer than the wavelength of the signal. In such applications there will be no reflected wave at the end of the cable if the load impedence equals the cable impedence. So 50 ohm cables is ideally connected to a 50 ohm load in order to eliminate reflections that can garble data transmission. In the case of audio frequencies the wavelength is much longer than the cable length therefore this design consideration is not applicable. In my opinion, all other factors being equal, using 50 or 75 ohm coax will have no impact of the performance an audio interconnect.
I am looking forward to hearing about the results of your Aircoil tests.
Roger McCuaig

TNT AirCoil signal cables
Hello Roger,
I'm very interested in your AirCoil cables. Do you have pictures or a detailed schema that can help me to understand how to assemble the various cables parts? Can you suggest me where I can buy the Neotech Ultra Purity Ohno cable, possibly in a shop online in Europe?
By the way, I already have coaxial self-made signal cables, made with the Aircom Plus: www.ssbusa.com/aircom.html. Have you ever heard about this cable for audiophiles purpose? What you think about it compared to your AirCoil project?
Thank you very much,
Paolo - E-mail: paoloxp79 (at) gmail.com

RMC
Dear Paolo,
Thank you for your interest in my cable design. Unfortunately I don't have any photos of the Aircoil cable build as it was done some time before I joined TNT-Audio and not with the intention of publishing my DIY project. The following is a brief description of the work that I provided to a previous emailer.
My original project used 4 wires, two on each side. I now recommend using only 2 wires as this works just as well and is easier and cheaper. Start by winding the two wires in a spiral around the teflon tubing. I used a heavy table vice to hold the wires and tube as I wound. Before making the connections I cut off the squashed ends of the wire and tubing. At each end connect one wire to the centre pin of your connector and the other wire to the outside pin of the connector. Do the same at the other end but remember that you have to connect the same wire to the same pin on each end. In other words don't connect wire 1 to the centre on one end and to the outside on the other. If they are different colours that will be easy, if not then you need to identify them in some way before you start or use a tester. If you wish, you can add a wire in the tubing to act as a ground drain. This wire must be connected to the outside pin at one end only. Don't forget to identify in some way the end where the drain is connected. I usually put a piece of heat shrink at each end to support the connections and make it longer at the end where the drain is connected. Also remember to slip on the connector covers before soldering the connections.
There are several Neotech distributors in Europe. The link - http://www.neotechcable.com/dealer.php has a list of distributors. If you contact one of these distributors they will surely be able to indicate the nearest source to your location.
I did a bit of research on the Aircom cable that you mentioned. With the air dielectric and the 100% shield it looks like it has great potential for use as an interconnect however the specs that I found indicate that it has a 2,7 mm solid OFC core. That is the equivalent of #9 AWG which in my mind is way too big and may cause problems with lack of flexibility and difficulty installing RCA connectors.
Hope you have fun with this project.
Roger McCuaig

A night at the Opéra?
Dear David,
Thank you for this reportage from the latest Capital Audiofest. Please believe me, it is absolutely normal not to be able to get tickets for the Opéra Garnier, as they are usually sold out months in advance. No discrimination then :-)
Have a good weekend,
Fabrizio - E-mail: faticadisisifo (at) gmail.com

DRH
Dear Fabrizio,
Thanks for exposing my musings as the vile slander they were, although that still doesn't absolve me from having been a very wet-behind-the-ears provincial American kid at the time. (Now, of course, you can remove "kid" from that; as to the rest, I'll remain studiously silent!).
Thanks, too, for reminding me that I haven't watched that Marx Bros. classic in far too long and that my daughter, only a few years younger than I was back then, has never seen it--time to break out the DVDs.
Happy listening to you!
David Hoehl

Review and reviewers
Hi,
I'm always been puzzled when a reviewer tells you that this guitar player was using a X guitar with Y strings and Z piezo mics. How does he/she knows unless he/she was being there at the recording session?
Take Jimi Hendrix as an example. OK anyone having seen photos of him playing the guitar can identify the guitar brand he was using. But the strings? The piezo mics on the guitar? The effects he used to use on his guitar amp? The effects that were added in post-production? If you weren't there at the mixing/mastering session chances are that you can't know. There are too many parameters which can have changed the original sound for you to identify a string brand or a guitar mic brand.
I've been doing live recording since these last 20 years. Mostly classical and jazz. With classical you cannot cheat as there is no processing. So yes, if the recording is faithful enough and if you have perfect pitch and an extended experience of classical music you might be able to recognize a Stradivarius from a Guarneri.
With jazz it's more towards the rock scene. For instance I use to capture the whole jazz band with a stereo pair. Despite spot micking the bass amp I lose some accuracy and tightness in the lows. Therefore I spot mic the double bass aimed at the f hole, as well as the kick drum, I use a HPF on the stereo pair to get rid of the muddy lows and mix in back the spot micked bass and kick drum into the overall mix. The result is better accuracy and tightness in the lows. But who can say that the bass player was using an X double bass, with Y strings, with a Z amplifier, with XYZ effects, with my own mix of direct bass/amplified bass? Nobody but me.
So how can a reviewer know? As the Who sung it “Don't get fooled again” and don't believe what is not believable from reviewers.
Jean-Christophe - E-mail: jean.xerri (at) adam.com.au

LC
Dear Jean-Christophe,
I mostly agree with your opinion! It is impossible to tell, using an amplified music recording, which kind of instrument/setting has been used for a particular session/track. Too much processing makes this investigation almost impossible. We at TNT-Audio do not make such strong assumptions, correct me if I'm wrong. All you/we can do when judging a component using an amplified music recording is to compare it to a well known reference. For this reason a reviewer's system should be extremely transparent! The component under review should be put in the condition to express itself as clearly as possible. If you compare a 1,000$ loudspeaker using a 10,000$ reference loudspeaker it is quite easy to understand when things go wrong, even with amplified music.
Thanks for your precious feedback!
Lucio Cadeddu

78 rpm turntables
Why on earth didn't you try and find a Technics SP15? A properly working SP15 is fantastic for 78 RPM playback.
Derek - E-mail: derek_vanveen (at) hotmail.com

DRH
Hello, Derek,
Actually, I did buy an SP-15, and not long afterward, in Part III of the series, I wrote about my (then limited) experience with it; see here. Since then, I've played with it some more, although I've now put it aside pending replacement of the Syntec arm with which it's fitted, for which I quickly developed a strong disliking. Be that as it may, on the basis of that trial, you're right--within its speed limits, and bearing in mind some potential electronic problems, it is a fine choice, and for 78s with "speed creep" the best I've tried.
Of note, however, since then I've learned about something that at the time I'd been assured did not exist: software that can do the same thing. That will be fodder for a future article, once I've had a chance to do some further research and personal experimenting. Meanwhile, thanks for writing and seconding my own good impressions of the Technics.
Regards,
David Hoehl

Re: DIY air-tube interconnect cable
Dear Roger,
Thank you for your informative answer including the reference to another interesting design - the TNT Shoestring. After e-mailing you I read about the experience from an audio gear designer, Jim Williams posting at Gearslutz, who claim that Ray Kimber of Kimber cables had a similar design to what you have which included a central ground conductor for balanced interconnection. Apparently this was a non-commercial design used in a studio which turned out to be of great performance.
I will try to use all the interesting information now in my hand to make a balanced cable, and will report back to you if/when I get to evaluate the result.
Best regards,
Marc - E-mail: marcholmstrom (at) icloud.com

RMC
I will try and find some information on the Kimber design that you mentioned. Looking forward to reading about your results.
Best regards,
Roger McCuaig

Just thanks!
Hello,
Thank you so much for your detailed and wonderful writings in TNT-Audio. It is a joy to read. I just started out with your latest part (III ?) in the series about 78 rpm recordings 15 minutes ago, but I to interrupt my reading to write you.
Thanks.
And please excuse me, I have to continue reading :-D
Best Regards,
Per - E-mail: nakfan (at) gmail.com

DRH
Dear Per,
Thanks for the very kind words. We at TNT all write as a labor of love, and our sole "paycheck" is knowing we give pleasure to our audience of like-minded audio enthusiasts. Well, my paycheck for the week just came with a big bonus! All the best, and happy listening to you.
David Hoehl

Transcriptor Saturn
Good day, Mark, I am a TNT-AUDIO reader, I write it in Italian which will translate with google. I address to YOU and not to the editor Lucio because you have owned the Transcriptor Saturn turntable, as you wrote in the Summer of 2008.
So you are familiar with the construction of the Saturn turntable. I bought the Transcriptors Saturn in 1973, and it still works. I installed a MK IV Mayware arm with pik-up grade reference platinum 1. The experts told me that on 5 + 3 points of support the disk it's not stable, is it? I always put the clamp. Would it be better for the dish to be flat? Can it be improved? Or is a new one better? If so what for one of equal value 1500 €.
I thank you in advance if you want to answer me.
Best regards,
Giosuè - E-mail: giosue.capelli (at) gmail.com

MW
Hi Giosuè,
I am very sorry that my Italian is good enough only for ordering food, so I have used online translation too.

You have a very good turntable. The Transcriptor Saturn has some advantages over the later Transcriptor Reference, especially with a long service life. I would advise that you clean and re-lubricate the main bearing and that you regularly clean the motor pulley and turntable platter rim. I also suggest that you make sure that the motor/switch capacitor still functions correctly to reduce the 'crack' sound through the loudspeakers.

There is debate again about whether minimal support is better than full support of the LP surface. You can experiment by buying a thin but rigid platter mat (for example, the Funk Achromat and fitting it (remember to adjust the Mayware arm height). I would not use a clamp with this turntable.
I remember the Mayware Mk IV is a good match for the Transcriptor Saturn because it is similar to the Transcriptor Fluid arm in is operation. The Grado is a good match for the Mayware so I imagine you are already making a better sound than you could buy now for 1500€.

Enjoy listening and use the money saved to buy more vinyl,
Ciao,
Mark Wheeler

DIY chipamps
Hello,
After 10 years there are still people reading your review(s), also about the Resurrector. I am about to make my first chipamp (from audiosector). Your review, it is not the first time I read it, got me interested in it again.. Therefore I emailed mr Marek but he replied that they are no longer available.
I was wondering if you still use it after all those years? That now leads to the idea that if you don't, maybe you want to sell your resurrector, but that idea just popped up now? I do not mean to be rude or anything.
What I did write you for: do you have any additional information from after the discussion on diyaudio.com? Maybe more ideas on what the Resurrector actually does? Maybe alternatives that came available at a later time? I also presume that now he does not sell or make them anymore, the real working of the thing does jot have to be kept a secret anymore.
In any casy, I love listening to music and I am always interested in improving the sound of ky audio set. I used to have ultra high end amplifiers, but after financial misfortune I jow have to do with EL84 mono amplifiers. They do not disappoint, not even compared to the mega dollar amps I had before. The chipamp I want to make because I have to do without my valve/tube amps for repairs and maintenance too often (they are aboit 60 years old), because I would love to make some audio myself and I read al lot of good things about chip amps.
Well, I am just curious if you could help me with some new ideas or further information about the resurrector.
In the meantime I wish you a lot of happiness
Sincerely,
Gaston - E-mail: dcd_gaston (at) hotmail.com

NW
Hi Gaston,
My advice to you would be to make a basic Gainclone, and see how you like it. The Resurrector did do something to the sound, but at a cost of great complexity. That is most likely why they never caught on. I don't have anything further to report on the Ressurector. Marek did make a simplified version of it, but I didn't think that it made a worthwhile improvement (if any). The samples that I received from Marek were encapsulated in resin, and I respected his wishes that I didn't look inside.
A good Gainclone should keep you satisfied while your old valve amplifiers are being repaired. A lot depends on the speakers that a chip amp is paired with. Chip amps taught me that we don't need to spend a fortune on hi-fi to enjoy our music.
My only other advice would be to be careful that you do not become too addicted to DIY hi-fi. Many of us landed up spending a fortune on the hobby!
Regards,
Nick Whetstone

Re: Active vs Duelund based passive crossover
Hi Nick,
Thank for taking the time to respond - that's really useful advice... I think you've put my active crossover idea to rest with regards to transmission line speakers anyway. I would happily choose an open baffle design, but am concerned about boundary interference - my living room is 4x5m and there is no opportunity to have the speakers placed into the room, they need to be situated against the wall. I am assuming that an Open Baffle design would not be good for this? If there are any DIT designs you think suitable, then please do let me know.
In my mind, the existing (full or nearly full range) commercial speakers best suited to my placement and room size would be something like a Wilson Audio Duette, Larsen 8 or Grimm Audio LS1 - I think a physical DIY copy of these is possible and I'm quite comfortable constructing my own amps, but the work that the manufacturers put into the crossovers (particularly on the LS1) is quite epic, so I doubt I could replicate it without existing full plans.
Of course I am impressed by Dutch & Dutch 8c and Kii Three, beolab 90's - but this approach is beyond DIY.
Thanks once again,
Gavin - E-mail: gjhodgson (at) yahoo.co.uk

NW
Hi Gavin,
I'm glad that you like the articles on TNT-Audio. To try and answer your questions:

  1. If you are buying a kit speaker from somewhere like IPL, it doesn't make much sense to change the design in any way. Most, if not all, the kit speaker suppliers like Ivan at IPL, spend a long time fine tuning their designs, to get the optimum performance from them. Yes, I did convert my A2 kit to active, but I think that a TL design is less adaptable than a bass reflex (and it involved changing the cabinet volume from the original design).
  2. As regards changing the crossover components, yes the Dueland components can make an improvement, but the significant extra cost must be taken into consideration. For instance, would the extra cost get you more gain from a more expensive kit?
  3. I have no experience of the plate amps so couldn't write an article on them (with or without you). My own active speakers use a Gainclone to power the woofers.
It sounds as though you have got the active bug, and I always suggest experimenting with something to see if you like it. If possible spend as little as possible, unless of course that you think you can sell on your creation if it doesn't meet your expectations.
Speakers are very subjective, and my preference these days after much experimenting and reviewing, is for open baffles. Apart from being easier to construct, once you hear that open sound, it is hard to go back to anything but very expensive boxes.
If I were you, I would look for an open baffle design on somewhere like the DIYAudio forums, and do an active version of that. If you are not up to building amps etc, there is quite a wide choice to buy.
I hope this helps you, and hasn't raised more questions that you started with.
Regards,
Nick Whetstone

DIY air-tube interconnect cable
Hello, Thank you for your interesting article on the teflontube interconnect. Maybe this project is even better suited to balanced signals?
I intend to build a balanced cable with four spiraled/crossed 30 awg signal conductors (two plus and two minus) and will try to find a center ground wire with really thick insulation so that I can avoid kinking of the teflon tube that you used as a center. I dont think that this center has to be teflon since it does not insulate any of the signal conductors. If I could find for example an 18awg center ground cable with thick polyurethane or oliofin or polyethylene insulation that should be fine I think.
What is your opinion?
Best regards,
Marc - E-mail: marcholmstrom (at) icloud.com

RMC
Dear Marc,
Thanks for your interest in the TNT AirCoil interconnect design. I don't have any experience with balanced interconnects so I can't provide much help on that other than to say that I think that theoretically it should work great. With respect to your idea to use a thick ground wire in the centre, I think that it would need to be almost the full diameter of the inside of the tube in order to provide any significant reduction in the susceptibility to kinking. That may make it difficult to thread into the tube. You are certainly right in your assessment that this wire doesn't have to be teflon insulated as it doesn't carry the audio signal.
I have another suggestion for you, Nick Whetstone wrote an article entitled TNT Shoestring in which he used the hollow core of a coax cable. This cable had the interesting characteristic that the core had channels in it which adds considerable structural rigidity compared to regular tubing. I don't know if this core is teflon though so you may be able to get that information from Nick. I hope that you will let us know how your project turns out.
Best regards
Roger McCuaig

Active vs Duelund based passive crossover
Hi Nick,
Great articles and I have requested to become a member of the forum. I am looking to do an IPL Transmission line speaker build - but I would like to go for an active crossover. I am nervous about this though with it being a transmission line, and Ivan has spent a great deal of time fine tuning the passive crossover, and it seems likely to me that I would encounter a loss of bass response moving to active.
I was wondering if substituting for Duelund components (or similar high end) in the existing passive crossover design would help remove most of the negative effects of the passive crossover? I also don't know if it is as simple as simply substituting resistors and inductors?
If I was to go active, I'd probably produce a separate enclosure using the new Hypex nCore Fusion plate amps due out in Q1 2018. If you believe this is a good route to go - as your articles suggest, could we perhaps write a joint article together on tnt-audio? There must be lot of people considering this, but information is somewhat lacking on the web on how this is achieved - your articles seem to be one of the best sources.
Cheers,
Gavin - E-mail: gjhodgson (at) yahoo.co.uk

NW
Hi Gavin,
I'm glad that you like the articles on TNT-Audio. To try and answer your questions:

  1. If you are buying a kit speaker from somewhere like IPL, it doesn't make much sense to change the design in any way. Most, if not all, the kit speaker suppliers like Ivan at IPL, spend a long time fine tuning their designs, to get the optimum performance from them. Yes, I did convert my A2 kit to active, but I think that a TL design is less adaptable than a bass reflex (and it involved changing the cabinet volume from the original design).
  2. As regards changing the crossover components, yes the Dueland components can make an improvement, but the significant extra cost must be taken into consideration. For instance, would the extra cost get you more gain from a more expensive kit?
  3. I have no experience of the plate amps so couldn't write an article on them (with or without you). My own active speakers use a Gainclone to power the woofers.
It sounds as though you have got the 'active' bug, and I always suggest experimenting with something to see if you like it. If possible spend as little as possible, unless of course that you think you can sell on your creation if it doesn't meet your expectations.
Speakers are very subjective, and my preference these days after much experimenting and reviewing, is for open baffles. Apart from being easier to construct, once you hear that open sound, it is hard to go back to anything but very expensive boxes.
If I were you, I would look for an open baffle design on somewhere like the DIYAudio forums, and do an active version of that. If you are not up to building amps etc, there is quite a wide choice to buy.
I hope this helps you, and hasn't raised more questions that you started with.
Regards,
Nick Whetstone

Rejuvenation of an older Linn Basik turntable
Dear Mark,
I am a long term reader of TNT Audio, I felt compelled to take the time and thank the TNT team for their fantastic work in conveying the pleasure of fine audio equipment. I read your article on the rejuvenation of an older Linn Basik turntable with great fascination. It always fascinates me how much pleasure one can extract from even entry-level HiFi it one has experience and the skills to do so. Pretty much needed in times of discard-after-use mainstream products.
Please keep going on!
Cheers from Vienna,
Dr. Magnus Bosse - E-mail: magnusbosse (at) gmail.com

MW
Dear Magnus,
Thank you for your kind words.
Much of what we do on TNT-audio.com is motivated by the wish to get the best listening pleasure from stereo in the home. Because we do it for love, rather than for money, we avoid the need to write with one eye on the advertising revenues. This means a basic page layout that loads fast in any part of the world and a love of getting more from upcycled classic products and from DIY as good as commercial offerings.
I love discovering that we have readers all over the world and that you are enjoying a c;assic British LP player in Vienna. Audiophiles are a global community driven by similar obsessions to get close to the concert experience at home.
Keep reading TNT audio and enjoying your LP's!
Happy Listening,
Mark Wheeler

DIY loudspeakers series
Hi Mark,
I came across your article on TNT-Audio. I could not locate rubber wedges for speaker damping online. Can you give me a clue where I can find them?
Regards,
Shashi - E-mail: shashi.dba (at) gmail.com

MW
Hi Shashi,
I bought mine from Deflex (who used to trade as Spectra Dynamics) in Wales. They seem primarily to specialise in classic car suspension now, and the deflex audio domain seems, rather bizarrely, to be used by an Indian Restaurant now"!

Fortunately any solid rubber block can be cut to create the same effect. The consistency of the rubber is not particularly important, and the rougher the cut surface the better. It is like trying to create a reasonable facsimile of an anechoic surface in the loudspeaker cabinet, because this will have more effect on standing waves that a bit of old fibreglass insulation.
I hope this is helpful, please let me know how you get on.
Happy tweaking,
Mark Wheeler

Gold Note PH-10
Good morning Mark,
I just read your comprehensive review of the Goldnote PH10. Thank you for your attention to detail. I can't say that I am knowledgeable enough to comprehend everything, but at least I have an ear for music I guess. I am using this stage with a Hana moving coil – low level, Transrotor ZET 1, and Sugden LA-4 pre and Sugden MPA-4 monos.
I too noticed the lack of 3 dimensionality, but didn't attribute to the phono stage until now. I am also running single ended output, but I am considering balanced. Could/Can you provide me with some suggestions on set-up for the Hana and advise me if I should go to balanced output? This would be extremely helpful. I have been experimenting, but I'm struggling with a high level of hiss and record noise, ie. ticks and pops and background noise. If you aren't allowed to advise I completely understand!
Thanks so much.
Brett - E-mail: brett.slotka (at) gm.com

MW
Hi Brett,
Thank you for your kind words about my review of the Goldnote PH10. I hope I did this excellent phono preamplifier stage justice. I hope my suggestions help you get the best from it.

I have no personal familiarity with the Hana pickup cartridges, but read good things about them. I am aware that Transrotor turntables, like Michells, major on soundstage scale (and the two companies might have had a relationship in the 70s or 80s, their products certainly shared many features). Sugden, one of the few survivors of the great Yorkshire HiFi cluster of the 1960's, continue to produce uniquely musical amplifiers, being among the first to employ class A output stages and class A levels of biasing to class AB, in modestly priced commercial amplifiers. There is only one balanced input on the Sugden LA-4 and if vinyl is your primary source this is the one to use. The difference electrically is up to 6dB better noise rejection and musically this allows the smallest signals to be lifted that much further from the noise floor (although noise floor is actually a misnomer). Fancy expensive bits of wire are not necessary; high quality pro sector cables (like Van Damme) or middle market audio cables well soldered to good XLR plugs are good enough (I do have some very costly balanced versions of cables that have far less difference than between RCA plug versions of the same wire). You should hear a difference.

Clicks, pops & background noise could be due to cartridge set up. Double check everything about your arm and cartridge set up. Make sure the room is warm enough (seriously) because stiff cartridge suspensions can tilt frequency response to treble emphasis and the vinyl-tip resonance also changes. Set the Goldnote to standard RIAA and experiment with cartridge loading. You will mainly notice changes in the bass quality, but other aspects, including soundstage and treble quality will also change.
Please let me know how you get on. Happy tweaking,
Mark Wheeler

Dodocool DA106 hack
Dear Nick, thanks for the fantastic review of this music player. I bought it with a discount and I'm very happy. I even managed to unlock the keys for the volume and playback when the screen is off.
Two things, however, spoil my experience, wanted to know if you had the same. I'm using a 128 gb sd card, which in my Cowon pd is super fast - I've got 54 gb of music in it. However, in the Dodocool, once a song is selected and I press play, it takes exactly 10 seconds for it to start.
Even worse, if during play I hit the back button, to navigate back to the folder structure, it sends me to random folders all the way back.
The firmware is the latest. Any idea?
Thanks a million.
Luca - E-mail: de_ioanna (at) yahoo.com

NW
Hi Luca,
I didn't know that we could hack the DA106 so well done. As regards the card issue, I do not appear to have that problem. My card is only a 16 gb though, so I don't know if the larger size is the issue. You would have to contact Dodocool about that.
As I haven't hacked the DA106, I can't press the 'BACK' button while it is playing so again, I would urge you to ask Dodocool. I'm pleased that you are otherwise enjoying this very likeable little music player.
Regards,
Nick Whetstone

Linn Basik article
Hi Mark
I have a Linn Basik with an old Helius Scorpio Mk1 and the Audio Technical AT95E. I agree with all that you say: unfussy very lovable turntable and better than most early LP12 Wrecks. I replaced the Akito arm a couple of years ago as it was sticky as they do. The Helius was given to me by a friend and I have to say that I love the sound as much as the Akito.. I Think that the Linn Basik plays everything in a loveable way and the AT-95 E is an icon. Thanks for the review on the Basik deck, it mirrors what I feel “no messing just great music”.
All the best,
Garry - E-mail: ducakrugs (at) gmail.com

MW
Hi Garry,
Thanks for the supporting evidence for what I heard. It's always good to hear that more than one of us has reached a similar conclusion.
I'd expect that your Linn Basik sounds even better with the Helius Scorpio. Although it was Helius's entry level arm, lacking the sophisticated bearing and counterweight shenanigans of their groundbreaking Orion tone-arm, it was at a slightly higher price point and performance back in the day, to the Linn Basik Plus. The Linn Akito also had design and manufacturing advantages over the Basik Plus (primarily a reworking of a Japanese budget OEM design) but the Akito materials leave much to be desired. decades down the line. The Helius Scorpio had different priorities. While the somewhat basik Linn junior arms could be a bit raucous in their pursuit of excitement, the Helius went the other way. The Scorpio Mk1 aimed for rigidity in its pursuit of information retrieval, and a Scorpio Mk1 would have comfortably outclassed the Akito in this. The Scorpio Mk2 had a more convenient sliding headshell and the Scorpio Mk3 reverted to conventional headshell slots. The Helius Scorpio had a chunky gimbal vertical bearing aligned with the headshell offset. In the Mk1 you might have the best of the Scorpio bunch, but comparisons do not seem to have been done.
Happy Listening,
Mark Wheeler

Linn Basik rejuvenation
Dear Mark,
I am a long term reader of TNT Audio, I felt compelled to take the time and thank the TNT team for their fantastic work in conveying the pleasure of fine audio equipment. I read your article on the rejuvenation of an older Linn Basik turntable with great fascination. It always fascinates me how much pleasure one can extract from even entry-level HiFi it one has experience and the skills to do so. Pretty much needed in times of discard-after-use mainstream products.
Please keep going on!
Cheers from Vienna,
Dr. Magnus Bosse, magnusbosse (at) gmail.com, (Oxford Crystallette/Linn Akito/Goldring 1020)

MW
Dear Magnus,
Thank you for your kind words.
Much of what we do on TNT-audio.com is motivated by the wish to get the best listening pleasure from stereo in the home. Because we do it for love, rather than for money, we avoid the need to write with one eye on the advertising revenues. This means a basic page layout that loads fast in any part of the world and a love of getting more from upcycled classic products and from DIY as good as commercial offerings.
I love discovering that we have readers all over the world and that you are enjoying a classic British LP player in Vienna. Audiophiles are a global community driven by similar obsessions to get close to the concert experience at home.

Keep reading TNT audio and enjoying your LP's!
Happy Listening,
Mark Wheeler

Pinnacle loudspeakers
Dave, do you any idea where or how I can purchase a pair of the 650ll to complete my 5.1 surround sound. I have attempted multiple times to contact Pinnacle but I believe they may be out of business. Any suggestions looked at e bay and Amazon BD 100 and 200 but no 650 ll.
Thanks Da
David - E-mail: solideogloria1984 (at) embarqmail.com

DH
Hello, and thanks for writing. One frustration about Pinnacle has always been the relative lack of information available about the company and its products--few mainstream reviews, little online chatter, etc. Not having been in the market for new speakers since buying my own pair of Pinnacles (which probably is enough to tell you that I remain very happy with them), I haven't been keeping an eye on the company, and I don't know that it is still in business, but then, I also don't know that it isn't. If you didn't hear back from the company, I'll admit that's not a good sign, as my own inquiries back when I wrote the review drew very prompt response. I did some prowling around on the Web, and the company website is still there, as are at least some pairs of Pinnacle speakers billed "new" on eBay. The one "authorized online retailer" that I checked via a link from the Pinnacle site, on the on the other hand, had no stock of anything Pinnacle. A mixed result, then, and probably not much help. I wish I could be more; perhaps one of our readers has better information? In all events, good luck in your search, and if you learn more elsewhere please do let us all know.
David Hoehl

Vinyl by post
Hi Lucio,
As someone who is unfortunate enough to work for the Royal Mail, I would just like to say that it might be a good idea to back your precious vinyl with a square sheet of plywood or mdf before you send it by mail. Nobody takes any notice of the "fragile" label on the parcel. Don't worry about the parcel dropping on the floor, what you have to worry about is the heavy pack of catalogues being thrown on top, or the metal car parts being thrown on top.
Everything gets thrown into a big canvas "sleeve", and sometimes we can't even see what is already in the sleeve!
Just sayin....
Andrew - E-maill: admc121 (at) googlemail.com

LC
Dear Andrew,
thanks for your precious, first-hand opinion on shipping our beloved LPs! Your advice is sound, I'd add also some massive bubble-wrapping, as one never knows.
Thanks for the feedback!
Lucio Cadeddu

Dodocool DA106 portable player
Sorry, Nick but this review doesn't meet your normally high standards. I would have ordered one but the "TNT Readers Discount" link takes me to an Amazon Italy Webpage.
I don't speak Italian, my Amazon UK details don't work with Amazon Italy and I haven't (short of learning Italian) the ability tol register with them. Also, it does seem that they won't ship to a UK address.
Interesting article - but a bit of a time waster.
Cordially,
Paul - E-mail: rutherfordpaul (at) yahoo.co.uk

NW
Hi Paul,
reviewers can only review what is given to them to audition. May I remind you that TNT-Audio is an independent site that is staffed by unpaid volunteers, and funded by Lucio Cadeddu out of his own pocket. As such we simply don't have the time or resources to check on suppliers' stock levels. I have gone back to Dodocool, and they apologise for the current low stocks due to the high demand, and are making every effort to have stock in early next year, and I am told that it will be available through Amazon UK (with a voucher discount).
I appreciate your frustration, and hope that you will be able to purchase a DA106 in the not too distant future.
Regards,
Nick Whetstone

DECCA SUPER GOLD rebuilt
Hi Mark

I do not know if it will be possible to have some info today but I try. I have a problem of "very annoying noise" generated by masses between head and turntable. I wanted to buy a reconstituted Decca Super Gold on my turntable (Roxan Radius 5) with the "Nima" unipivot arm. I enclose a photo of the head seen the difference of the model.supplied.

I realised that by moving the arm away from the central axis or the engine, the noise increases or decreases. I would kindly ask you what I could do to eliminate this noise ??? What could it depend on ??? What tests can I do to solve??? The Roksan uses a head-to-plug signal connection cable.
The phono pre-amplifier, as well as the line pre-amplifier, is a Dissanayake (valve) . The power amplifier is a Krell KSA50 (class A solid state).
Saluti,
Giancarlo - E-mail: gdesiro (at) sogei.it

MW
Hi Giancarlo,
Knowing how much information might be lost in online translation, I had to infer from the roots of words like "Rumore", that the noise is of the nature of background hum or rumble. Unless there is a serious fault with your Roksan Radius, it will not be turntable rumble that causes a problem. There is unlikely to be a mismatch between the moving mass of the Roksan Nima arm (11g) and the Decca London cartridge compliance. Unipivot pick-up arms really work well with Decca London cartridges; Decca's own arm was a unipivot and my experience is good with a Hadcock GH242SE silver. The Nima manual can be downloaded here. Therefore, by process of elimination, we reach the conclusion that the noise is electrical.

Welcome to the joy of trying to make Decca London cartridges work successfully in the real world.

Sarath Dissanayake makes amplifiers that compete at the level of Kondo and ARC Ref, so assuming that the system works fine with other cartridges, the problem is not an earth loop in the amplification. However, if your phono pre-amplifier is set to high enough gain for moving coil cartridges, you must change the gain setting to moving magnet cartridges, using the manufacturer's instructions. If there is an earth (ground) post on the back of the phono pre-amplifier this must be connected to the Roksan chassis.

If the input impedance is set at anything other than 47k-ohms, or similar, this needs to change too. Decca London cartridges often work best, in my experience, into 33k-ohms, which flattens the frequency response. This is fine tuning you can try after you have identified and eliminated the source of hum.

It may be simply that the Nima was previously being grounded (earthed) via the previous pick-up cartridge and now this is not working because the Decca London has a mostly plastic structure in a thin metal can. The Nima has an unusual wiring loom, which may cause a problem with the already troublesome Decca London. You may test if the Nima is being grounded (earthed) correctly. Swing the arm from its rest while touching the tube very lightly. If the noise changes when you cease touching or when you tighten your grip, the arm is not grounded (earthed). If there is no change, the problem is probably at the cartridge. You will notice from the picture that the cartridge does not have the usual configuration of 4 pins in a square pattern. This is because the pick-up coils themselves are cvonnected to a common ground (earth) because they use a sum-and-difference system of horizontal and vertical coils, rather than the usual pair of 45 degree angled coils. Frequently there is a problem between the contacts of the coils and those of the pins (mine has this problem at the moment). Also, the metal can that is supposed to screen the coils from outside interference must have a good contact with the earth (ground) pin of the right channel. Try swapping all the pins between left and right channels to hear if the problem changes. If the problem is solved, merely reverse the connections from left and right between the phono pre-amplifier and line pre-amplifier.

I hope this helps. If not, you will need to delve deeper because both the Roksan Nima and the Decca London Super Gold can be a challenge to set up, but once they are working the rewards are worthwhile. Happy Listening,
Mark Wheeler

Geneva XL review and question
Dear Lucio,
First I'd like to say I love your work on the TNT audio website. Really nice website that is run by music enthousiasts! I'v been reading your 2009 review on the Geneva L and XL with a lot of excitement and interest and am wondering if you could help me with something.
Currently I am able to acquire a Geneva XL of which the amps are broken and I am planning to replace these. Before taking the step of actually buying this system I'm conducting some research on the hardware that has been put in and the potential costs involved.
The thing is that I cannot find a lot of info on the amps and since you seem to know quite a lot about amps, I was wondering if know which amps Geneva uses to build these systems and what amp could be a (maybe even better) replacement?
If you are willing to help me, that would be awesome!
Thank you in advance,
Kind regards,
Bastiaan - E-mail: bas-lo (at) hotmail.com

LC
Dear Bastiaan,
have you REALLY read the review carefully? It's all written in there...the internal amplification is provided by DAE-1™ Class D modules made by D2Audio. Visit their website for more details and infos. I'm not 100% you can purchase this modules directly from the factory but you can try contacting them and explaining your needs. You shouldn't try anything else, since the heart of the EmbracingSound that makes the Geneva speakers so unique relies on these modules. Different Class D modules won't work. Simple as that.
Hope this helped somehow,
Lucio Cadeddu

NAD 314
Dear Sir,
Your 1997 review is spot on. I use it for my everyday amp. Even only rated at 35 watts it drives my Gale 401's or IMF studio monitors with ease and classic british loudspeakers of the 70's such as I collect take off the overbright edge you note.
Thank you
Richard - E-mail: sandings.farm (at) btinternet.com

[Listening room]

LC
Dear Richard,
thanks for your comments and precious feedback. Nice little amp you have and even nicer loudspeakers!!! I'm envious! :-)
Congrats and happy listening,
Lucio Cadeddu

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